Medallion Guarantees and Stock Transfer agents

I have posted a few times on the importance of funding your trust. I have also posted about my inclination toward consolidation of assets. As stated you have to consider FDIC insurance, other insurance, taxes, etc… but in general I am a big proponent of consolidation. I also have mentioned that I feel holding stocks with transfer agents is a huge mistake. I have more information to share related to my mom’s passing related to all that and the difficulty of obtaining a Medallion Guarantee.

As I have posted before my mom loved her dividend reinvestment accounts (DRIPs). She threw in small contributions, when she could, and ended up with a large number of different holdings. They were held with the transfer agents: Computershare, American Stock Transfer, and Wells Fargo Shareowner Services. The dollar values were not huge but it was a wide variety of blue chip companies.

Over the years I was able to get my mom to transfer her DRIPs into a brokerage account at the brokerage house of her choice. Unfortunately she didn’t get every single one in. For the most part the ones that were left out were extremely small holdings. Often just a fractional share. As I posted recently, in my experiences with her Chase stock, the amount of the stock may literally be pennies or less in value.

In recent months my mom received several pieces of mail from Wells Fargo Shareowner Services. They had different account numbers but no mention of a particular stock or number of shares.  I dutifully wrote to Wells Fargo Shareowner Services and asked them if it was Wells Fargo Bank stock or a different stock, how many shares were owned (expecting the answer to be zero or close to zero) and if they change the address since my mom was deceased.

Of course I included a copy of my mom’s death certificate and the certification of trust for her trust. I included those papers with each mailing.

I received several written communications back that they had made the address change. In fact, they sent that letter to the old address and the new address so I got each one twice. So let’s say I received two envelopes for each of 6 accounts from Wells Fargo Shareowner Services so 50 cents each in postage we are at $6.00 right there.

I wrote back and again asked for information on if it’s Wells Fargo Bank stock or some other company and how many shares.  They wrote back indicating that I need to have a form completed by my bank with the Medallion Guarantee.  I wrote back and explained I didn’t really want to go to the bank and wait for the person to apply the Medallion Guarantee if the stocks were worth nothing. I added that they could send the information to my mom’s address if they didn’t want to send to me.

SIDE NOTE: So basically they were willing to change the mailing address away from my mom’s house with a photo copy of a death certificate but won’t give me any other information. I find that odd.

Anyway, they reply yet again that I have to have the Medallion Guarantee from my bank before they will give me any information.

So, finally yesterday I went to my bank. It’s actually a credit union. I like them so wont totally throw them under the bus but yesterday I felt the service I received was not as great as usual. It was a bit crisp and formal for my liking. I prefer more smiles.  The exchange went like this:

Me (after a short wait): Hi, I need to have this form Medallion Guaranteed.

Them: Sure we can do that. What is the value of the stock?

Me: I don’t know. That’s what I am trying to find out.

Them: Well, the Medallion Guarantee is only good for a certain dollar amount so I need to know how much.

Me: That’s the problem. They won’t tell me how much is there without getting the Medallion Guarantee on this form but I am sure it’s less than whatever limit your Medallion Guarantee is good for.

Them: Well, we can not apply the Medallion Guarantee without you verbally telling us the value.

Me (totally flustered by the ludicrousness of the situation): Ok, fine it’s $1,000. (Honestly, I wish it was $1,000 as I am expecting it’s zero but whatever…wishful thinking and happy thoughts).

Them: Ok, now do you have an account in the name of this trust here?

Me: Actually I don’t. We have our personal trust here but not my mom’s trust.

Them: I am sorry we can’t Medallion Guarantee without you having the trust here or proof that you are the trustee. Wells Fargo may do it since they are the transfer agent!?

SIDE NOTE: I kept my humor and said “I don’t have an account there… actually based on the news this week maybe I do have an account there!?” She didn’t laugh.

Me: You just did the Medallion Guarantee a few weeks ago on other forms for me.

Them: I know I did but you had proof that you were the trustee then.

Me (feeling like I should close all my accounts at their credit union but I managed to stammer out a semi-friendly reply): Ok, I’ll come back with the proof that I am the trustee.

Sooooooo, I am going to go back today with the proof that I am the trustee. With any luck I will get my darn Medallion Guarantee affixed to the form. I will then mail it to Wells Fargo Shareowner Services. They will then reply and probably tell me all 6 accounts have zero shares of stock. However, at least I can button that issue up and move on with life.

What’s my point?

Heck, I don’t know. I just needed to vent a little. Seriously though, close your darn DRIP accounts and move your assets to brokerage accounts. I don’t care what broker. You can do the online research to find the place you want. There are “full service” brokers, there are “discount” brokers and some that are sort of a hybrid. The point is get your stocks into an account where you can easily sell them when you need to.  ALSO, totally close your old DRIP accounts so your kids don’t get the run-around trying to figure out if there is any value in them.

Happy Friday.  -John

 

The Most Practical Estate Planning Blog Post EVER

After over 20 years as an estate planning attorney I feel pretty well qualified in giving people advice on estate planning matters. I have helped plan for death and I have helped clean up after death; hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of times. Also, this year, I have dealt with the clean up after my mom’s death and serving as her trustee.  The combination of significant professional experience and the untimely death of my mom give me the ability to speak with authority here. Please consider each point I make here to help you and your loved ones get the most out of your estate plan. I present my most practical estate planning blog post EVER!

PRACTICAL POINT #1: Keep it simple if you can.  I see it all the time. People want to control from the grave and come up with difficult to administer provisions. Or provisions that are hard to enforce due to changed situations and circumstances. Keeping it simple can avoid a lot of problems. Of course there are some situations where simplicity doesn’t work but consider the simple options first.

PRACTICAL POINT #2: Living trusts are pretty great.  I have seen articles about whether wills are good enough for some people. Or if probate can be avoided without using a trust through joint tenancy and beneficiary designations. The point of this post is not to get into the details about why that’s often wrong. The key is trusts, if set up right, are really pretty great! They avoid probate court which should save your loved ones a lot of time and money.  A proper trust takes care of you at death AND at incapacity.

PRACTICAL POINT #3: Fund your trust.  I remind every client to fund their trust. I send letters, I tell them in meetings, I send emails, I tell them on the phone. Not sure what else I can do. People, and this means you, GET YOUR ASSETS PROPERLY TIED TO YOUR TRUST. There are some exceptions (retirement assets) but most assets should be tied to your trust. Your house should be deeded to your trust. Your banks and investment accounts should actually be held in the name of the trust in the financial institution’s records.

PRACTICAL POINT #4: Do a restatement of trust not amendments.  I had a new client the other day who came in with 4 or 5 amendments to an old trust. They had a huge pile of paper. It was a mess. In most cases a restatement of trust can give you one clean trust document. This will make it much easier for your trustee to carry out your wishes after your death. If your attorney tries to do an amendment, rather than a restatement, ask them about the latter as an option.

PRACTICAL POINT #5: Consider adding a co-trustee while you are alive.  Some people don’t like the idea of having their child (even if they are 60 years old) or other trusted person on their bank account. However, adding your trustee as a co-trustee while you are alive can make things so much easier. By doing that they are already on your accounts when you go in for surgery or go into a nursing home. Likewise, they are already on your accounts at death. This way there is no delay in them having access to your funds for paying your bills.

PRACTICAL POINT #6: Consolidation.  While being aware of FDIC insurance is important and advised you should look into consolidating assets where you can.  The less accounts you have when you die the easier it will be for your successor trustee. Less is more!  There are just no other ways of saying it. Again, be aware of FDIC and other insurance coverage issues but for most people they can consolidate their accounts without concern.

PRACTICAL POINT #7: Clean up.  Semi-related to consolidation I encourage you to get rid of the little stuff. If you have a $100 savings bond cash it out!  Even $500 cash it out!  Maybe even bigger. Weigh the interest rate and the tax benefits against whatever headache you may be leaving for your loved ones. Likewise for mineral rights in another state, small partnership interests, timeshares you don’t use, and other small assets. When in doubt throw it out!

I could go on but I’ll stop there. If you have questions about how have a practical estate plan let me know.  -John

CONSOLIDATE YOUR ASSETS INTO YOUR TRUST

As you likely know, in the email world, to use ALL CAPS means that you are “yelling.”  Or, should I say, “YELLING!?”  So the title to this post could be construed as my YELLING and I am ok with that.

For the entirety of my career I have encouraged clients to consolidate assets, put individual stocks into a brokerage account, make sure all assets are in your trust, and sell small assets. It is easier to do all of these things while you are alive rather than after death. It’s a huge gift to your loved ones to organize your affairs so do it for them if not yourself.

As many of my readers know I lost my mom in March of this year. A traumatic event which we are dealing with.  As I mentioned previously my mom gave me the “gift” of keeping me busy cleaning up loose ends.  For years I encouraged her to get all her stocks into her trust and into her brokerage account. For years she worked on this but never quite finished. Her death was unexpected as it typically is so you can’t wait to organize and consolidate your assets. Do it now!

My mom LOVED her stocks. The investments were not huge dollar amounts but she loved feeling like she had ownership in so many companies. In many cases it was just a few hundred dollars but she liked it so she kept on sending $20 a month, or $50 a month, or whatever she could spare to various companies over the years. She took great pride in her stocks.

So my gift has been that I have been able to keep my idle time to a minimum by trying to clean up these loose ends.  I probably found evidence of ownership in 40 or so stock companies. I sent letters to all of them.  Many were quick to reply to say that she had successfully closed the account by moving the balance to a brokerage account. Many replied that there was a small amount of shares there and that paperwork could generate an even longer blog so I’ll save that for another day.

Today I want to focus on why I dislike holding stocks with transfer agents rather than with a brokerage account. Again, I want to remind you, to CONSOLIDATE YOUR ASSETS INTO YOUR TRUST!

Case in point is her holding in JP Morgan Chase & Co. Back in April I sent Computershare, the transfer agent for Chase, a letter indicating that I see my mom used to own shares of Chase and I would like to know if they still exist. Computershare replied that yes she did have a balance but wouldn’t tell me what that balance was.  They did, however, send the normal paperwork for me to fill out as all of the transfer agents have required. That is, merely to change the account from my mom’s name as trustee to my name as trustee I have to fill out multiple forms… for each individual holding since she didn’t get them all into a brokerage account.

  • One form, the affidavit of domicile, requires a notary.
  • One form, the account transfer form, requires a medalion gaurantee which means I have to leave work, wait at the bank, to get a bank official to give a fancy stamp (really just like a notary stamp but more special apparently) to show it’s really me.  Let me pause here and say that my bank did their due diligence and perused the form carefully and finally stamped it
  • I also had to fill out an IRS W9 form with the tax id (or EIN or TIN) of the trust.
  • I had to send a certified death certificate.
  • I had to send a certification of trust.

So let’s say for most people the costs at this point, assuming they are not paying an attorney to help, would be:

  • Notary of affidavit of domicile $10
  • Medallion guarantee on transfer form $10
  • Certified death certificate $20
  • Postage to mail everything $1
  • Paper, ink, gasoline, etc….

Lucky for me I have many notaries on staff so I saved that cost and our credit union agreed to waive the medallion fee so I saved those expenses. However, I am still out some money here and a lot of time.

Now, also, I should say that Computershare is spending money too. They are replying to my letter which requires employee time and postage. Let’s say that the time for an employee to review my first letter, reply to my letter, and postage is $5 in total expense. That’s a wild guess on my part.

So after I sent Computershare the huge package of completed forms they replied with another letter (shall we assume at least $5 more spent as it probably took an employee a little longer to review everything I sent) indicating they couldn’t liquidate the shares because the value would be less than the costs to sell. Ok, so at least I knew then it was a minor holding and I wouldn’t worry more about it.

A few days later I got two separate letters from Computershare. One showing that the account with my mom’s name as trustee had been closed and now had a zero balance. Shall we assume another $5 spent by Computershare!?  Also, on that day I got a letter indicating the new account is set up in my name as trustee and finally showed me the extent of the trust’s holding in JP Morgan Chase & Co. Again, let’s assume Computershare spent yet another five bucks!

If you haven’t given up on me yet I am guessing you want to know what the trust owns right!?

Well, it is .000300 of a share of stock.  The current value of a share of JP Morgan Chase & Co is $62.28 according to the Computershare letter. Thus my mom’s trust now holds .02 (or TWO CENTS) of JP Morgan chase & Co. Look at the far right column below in the picture.

Computershare Statement

How did this happen?  At some point, in the past few years, my mom moved her shares of JP Morgan Chase & Co into her brokerage account. However, a dividend came in after the transfer. Since my mom loved the automatic dividend reinvestment plan Computershare apparently reinvested the small dividend into stock.  My mom didn’t notice or perhaps didn’t get mail since it was a low value I don’t know. Thus the “account” sat with it’s minuscule holding.

What can I do about this?

  1. Ignore it.
  2. Spend another 48 cents to write back to them and ask them if there is some way to just close the account and make the two cents go away. Of course Computershare will likely reply, expending another $5 let’s say, to tell me they can’t do that.

Yes, I have mild OCD and I don’t like this stupid little account out there but probably nothing I can do.

So let my wasting of time be a lesson to you…

  • CONSOLIDATE YOUR ASSETS,
  • PUT YOUR STOCKS INTO A BROKERAGE ACCOUNT,
  • GET RID OF SMALL ACCOUNTS,
  • MAKE SURE EVERYTHING IS IN THE TRUST!

Have a nice day.

-John

Lessons from mom on estate planning

It’s only been three weeks, to the day, since my mom died and I have a few thoughts on what I have learned in regard to her estate planning matters. Some things done right and things not done right.

VICTORY: My mom named me as co-trustee on her trust almost 10 years ago when she was in her mid-60’s. At the time she traveled a lot so it was convenient to have me on her bank accounts if she was out of the country. However, merely being co-owner is not enough it should be in the trust and as co-trustees. Upon her death I was already on her account so was able to keep on writing checks as needed.

VICTORY: My mom was an estate planning attorney and was pretty careful to acquire assets in the name of her trust. I believe we will avoid a trip to the probate court. Might be a few small refund checks, and the like, that come in to her name but those can be dealt with by small estate affidavit.

VICTORY: My mom had some cash in her checking account. It is amazing how much it costs to die in this country. Yes, a lot of things are optional but if given the option, when it’s your mom or dad, don’t you want to say YES?  Having cash available makes it so you can say yes to every upgrade, every reasonable option, and help send your loved one out in proper style! Plus, you may need to pack up a house, hire people, hire movers, etc….  Cash on hand comes in handy!

SET BACK: My mom owned a few, low value, items not in her trust. Most notably factional shares of stock. I can not tell you how important it is to get all your stocks and investments into your trust and please consider holding it all at a stock brokerage company rather than in paper form or in direct investment accounts with each company. The amount of paperwork is tremendous… even when the dollar values are low.

SET BACK: My mom liked to have her assets spread out at a few different financial institutions. With the Patriot Act every bank transaction is a major fiasco. In my opinion less is more when it comes to financial institutions. Assuming there are not FDIC insurance issues (over $250k for cash deposits) I encourage consolidation. In particular I like to have stocks consolidated to one institution. It makes it MUCH easier when someone dies.

At the moment that’s what I have. I am sure there will be more, good and bad, that I learn. In closing I want to reiterate the above set back though. Please get ALL your assets in your trust and please consider putting all stock into ONE stock brokerage to make transfer easier after death!

-John

Losing a loved one

We have all lost a loved one… or will eventually lose a loved one. Losing a loved one is hard there is no question. It is a sad reality of life though.  I lost my dad when I was 14. I remember it well of course.  My mom was a regular on the grief group circuit around west Los Angeles. We talked about the good times we had had with my dad and we moved on. We never forgot him, of course, but life does go on.  As an estate planning attorney, since 1994, I have talked to countless families about losing their loved ones.  In fact, sometimes it’s the loved one talking to me before they die but they know their day is coming very soon due to illness.

My world was rocked on March 11, 2016 when I received a call that my mom and step-father were dead.  Sadly it was a murder-suicide. My step-father, was a great man, who had seemingly benign paranoia issues. Obviously it was much worse than we realized. Ask questions! Do not ignore! Does the picture below look like someone who is unhappy?

Perhaps my message is more of a public service announcement… DO NOT IGNORE MENTAL HEALTH red flags with your loved ones. Even very small red flags could be something worse. Encourage your family and friends to seek medical advice. Help them get to the doctor. I do not believe there was a single member of our families that was not shocked and surprised by the actions he took.  Let’s avoid more surprises like this and deal with mental health head on!

Of course this is an estate planning and probate law blog so let’s talk about that. My mom’s estate plan was pretty well thought out and planned. However, even we didn’t have it 100% organized. There are still a few small assets not in her trust. Not a big deal but more paperwork for me to deal with. Get your trust set up, get ALL your assets correctly tied to your trust, eliminate the unnecessary assets, and simplify what you can! Your loved ones will be grateful to you!

Both my parents were attorneys. I know, I know, that’s really scary. Let me assure you that dinner time conversation, in our house, was horrible growing up.  My mom actually went back to law school when I was about 7 or 8 so our dinner times, for 3 years, was dominated by law school talk.  How funny that 15 years later I would go to law school!  My mom even did estate planning, like me, so we would go to estate planning conferences together.  What a great way to spend time with your mom!

There are several articles about my mom on the web but I thought this one, from the Logan Herald Journal, was the best so I share the link for you here. Please get your estate plan done as it can minimize the confusion and problems if a loved one dies suddenly.

RIP, Mary Flynn Palley, 1942-2016.

-John

mary.dell

 

 

 

Billable Hours – be careful!

I was talking to one of my probate clients yesterday and he told me a story about a bill he received from the attorney who drafted his mom’s will and trust which include some scary billable hours.  My client, who we will call Bob called the drafting attorney who we will call Tom.  Bob called Tom and they spoke for 20 minutes.  It was a couple of days after Bob’s mom died and he said that Tom was very respectful on the phone and the call was primarily personal in nature and not about probate or trust administration “business.”  Bob told me how much Tom charged him and I was in such shock I wanted to share.

Before I go on let me state the purpose of this blog post.  BE VERY CLEAR WHEN YOU SPEAK TO AN ATTORNEY TO DETERMINE IF YOU HAVE HIRED THEM OR NOT.  Unfortunately some attorneys feel that every phone call is an opportunity to turn the clock on and start billing.  I pride myself on NOT following such horrifying practices but, sadly, there are still attorneys that operate like this.  So, when you call the attorney that drafted your mom’s will or trust ask them “Am I being charged for this call?”  Also you can tell them, “I am not hiring you at this point I am just gathering some information….”

It’s not always clear if you have hired them or not so try to make it clear. There is nothing to be embarrassed about. It’s important for both you and the attorney to avoid miscommunications and misunderstandings.

In this case, as mentioned, Bob called Tom a couple days after his mom died. He was still in shock and, obviously, in grief.  To me that’s a great opportunity to make sure my billable hour clock is NOT on.  It’s a great opportunity to talk for 10 or 15 minutes and set the stage for how I can help that person get through the trust or probate process.  If they hire me I will bill for my subsequent time but I try to make it very clear if I have been hired or not before I start charging.  Also, I often operate on a flat fee basis to avoid this type of billable hour shock. What does your attorney do?

Some of the highlights (I am not taking word for word from the bill):

Review will, trust, file and have phone call with Bob 2.3 (yes, that’s over 2 hours for a 20 minute phone call)

Plus a .2 charge by the office paralegal for her work in prepping Tom for the big phone call.

Draft fee agreement, email client, etc…  .9 (yes, that’s one hour to fill out a form fee agreement – NO we do not charge you for preparing a fee agreement)

On a Monday, above, Tom billed 2.3 hours (let me repeat HOURS) reviewing a trust and will that he himself wrote a few years earlier.  On Wednesday he billed 2.9 additional hours for reviewing the documents. I imagine after 5 hours of review he had them down to memory, right!?

A few other misc charges by Tom and also his paralegal including a lot of back and forth stuff between them.

I won’t bore you with every detail but it totaled over EIGHT HOURS and over $1,900 for a 20 minute phone call. I call this billable hour shock!  Bob doesn’t feel like he hired Tom but Tom, apparently, thought he was hired.  Bob seems pretty astute to me and thus I tend to believe him that he had no clue he had hired Tom. In fact, he mentioned when he got the proposed fee agreement in the mail he just threw it away because he didn’t intend to hire Tom.

Now the State Bar of California has ethics rules for lawyers. Yes, really and yes I am sure there is a funny lawyer joke that should be inserted here.  One ethics rule specifies that if the legal bill (fees and costs) is reasonably expected to exceed $1,000 we are to obtain a written fee agreement for the work.  In my office we try to do this for every matter, even if under $1,000, to avoid confusion and misunderstandings.  A written fee agreement takes a lot of the guess work out of it!

Some things you can do to protect yourself from this problem that Bob has:

  • Clearly state you are not hiring the attorney yet – just gathering information;
  • Ask if you are being charged for the call;
  • Perhaps send a follow up email “Thank you for the time today if I decide to hire your firm I will notify you by email”;

If you do decide to hire them you might then ask some further questions:

  • Ask what their hourly rate is;
  • Ask if they charge for paralegal time;
  • Ask if they add on an administrative fee;
  • Ask if they charge you for every call and every email;
  • Ask if their paralegal or other attorneys in the office also bill on your file;
  • Ask the attorney for an estimate of his fees for the work that is needed;
  • Ask the attorney if they offer flat fee or contingency fee arrangements;

Oh ya, I did gave Bob some suggestions for clearing this bill up. I know Tom. He has a good reputation and I think it was just a mistake on his part. Although as I type that it’s hard to not think just a little bit lower of Tom.  Honestly, it’s hard for me to think it’s just a mistake.   Whatever the case, I am hopeful he will agree to write off that bill in total.  Bob told me he doesn’t like to be in debt but he really feels it’s unfair. Hopefully Bob can resolve it quickly. If Tom is half as smart as I think he is it will take one email from Bob to resolve this and close the matter.

Also, I think this cemented things for Bob that he was smart to hire me and not Tom. Hey, just being honest here!

You should be very comfortable with the attorney BEFORE you hire them. If you aren’t then I would keep looking!   -John

Funding a bank account “in” to a California revocable living family trust

For 20 years I have been telling people how to “put” their bank accounts and other assets into their trusts.  Some things, like real estate, are pretty easy. We just prepare a deed, our client signs it, and we send it in for recording.  Clients who work with full service financial professionals also have it easy as the staff at those financial companies tend to be well trained at trust funding.

We usually start with a letter to the financial institution. If that doesn’t do the trick then we always advise our clients to go into the branch if that’s possible. Some things are just best done in person though.  I have not put a new asset into to my wife and my trust in some years.  We have had a trust for about 15 years, banked at the same credit union throughout, and never put our main bank account into our revocable trust.  What’s that story about the cobbler’s son….

Ok, the balance isn’t huge but it’s enough that it would come in handy for our successor trustee should they need money to pay bills if we are incapacitated or deceased. So we finally did it!  I actually first went in a few weeks ago but the friendly credit union employee told me that my wife had to be there since she was primary holder on the account. So for the next two or three weeks my wife and I talked about going in. Finally yesterday, Saturday, we strolled in as they opened their doors at 9:00.  The whole process took 15 minutes.

So what happened?

We handed the credit union employee our certification of trust or trust certificate or, what some call, a certified extract or abstract. In summary it’s a shortened version of your trust.  Our “CE” is usually two pages including the notary block.  In our opinion the goal of the CE is brevity and just giving the bank, credit union or financial institution what they need.  I am going with the assumption that banks and credit unions generally have the same requirements. However, is important to note that each bank or CU has their own rules. Plus, as I like to (half) joke, each bank or credit union branch may have their own rules… and of course each bank or CU employee may do things differently.  So take this for our actual experience. Your experience should be similar.

We gave the employee the CE and he proceeded to go through our account on his computer.  We have several sub accounts set up so it took him a several minutes to check boxes and enter the trust name for each one.  Then he took the name of our successor trustee, from the CE, and entered that into the computer.  He then asked for the name of our beneficiaries. I told him that in the past I have preferred to put “named individuals” as I don’t like to divulge the private information that is our beneficiaries (actually just our kids).  He explained that the NCUSIF (National Credit Union Insurance Fund) which, he claimed, is essentially the same as the bank’s FDIC gives the $250,000 per person insurance to each beneficiary.

Ok, let’s stop here for a second and take a detour. I do not know if what he says is right. Since my account has well below $250,000 it’s a non-issue for me. However, if your account is anywhere close to $250,000 you should definitely check, double check and triple check the rules.  My advice is always to have less than $250,000 at any one bank. Why take a chance with interpreting the FDIC or NCUSIF rules?  Is it really the contingent beneficiaries I asked the employee?  Why not the current beneficiaries? It doesn’t make any sense to me. So, again, let me repeat that I encourage you to never exceed $250,000 at a financial institution unless you are comfortable with their insurance rules.

So the nice and informative employee finished inputting everything and then had us sign (electronically) new signature cards confirming everything on the account and information about our trust.  It was easy.

Let me stress a couple things:

  1. Our account numbers did NOT change at our credit union (this varies among different banks and CUs);
  2. Our checks do NOT have the name of our trust on them (again this varies);
  3. It took about 15 minutes.

The key here that to have a trust and not spend these 15 minutes just exposes your loved ones to a probate after your passing or incapacity so take the time and fund that trust!

Contact us with questions.  -John

 

 

Another On-line Will Form Problem

Ouch. Of course attorneys can make mistakes too but in this case it was the use of an online document service (unnamed to protect the guilty) that messed up. Decedent, we will call Betty, signed a will a few months before dying. Betty asked unnamed online document service to write the will to give all her assets to her one child and nothing to the children of her deceased child. This seemed like a great idea as she saved money, right? I am sure an online will form is cheaper than hiring an attorney, right?

You maybe can see where this is going….

Unfortunately the online document service didn’t write it the way Betty wanted. So instead of 100% of a $300k house my client gets only one-half of a $300k house and the estranged children of deceased child (brother to my client) get the other one-half.

Needless to say client is UPSET! I am just the messenger and still she seemed mad at me. It sucks. Obviously we all wish Betty had just hired an experienced estate planning attorney to get it done right. However, that ship has sailed. She didn’t hire an attorney. Betty tried to save money and it bit her family in the tail!

I should add there is a place for online document services but, in my opinion, only in extremely straight-forward situations. Plus, even then you should read and understand what you are signing!

One side note is that an online will form company, no matter how much advertising they do, has to be able to explain the legal options with an experts precision. For example, why didn’t the online form company suggest a living trust? That would have saved Betty’s family even more money… while, if they had done that right.

Don’t be a Betty. Get your will and/or trust done properly by an experienced estate planning attorney.

-John

Getting on with life and avoiding the family fights

I recently talked to a prospective client. His story made me think of one thing, though I didn’t tell him in these words, IT’S TIME TO SOLVE THIS AND GET ON WITH YOUR LIFE!

His story was one I have heard countless times.  Siblings fighting.  It’s not always clear what exactly they are fighting about and an outside mediator can probably solve everything in 5 minutes. I often say, not to the clients, that issues stem from when they were five years old or at some point when the older sibling was mean to the younger sibling, or the time mom babied the younger sibling and the older sibling felt bad, or whatever. It doesn’t matter the background. The fact is it’s 50-60 years later so let’s help you move on with life.

I am not a therapist or a counselor but my legal services do the same thing sometimes.

My advice is probably what some family law attorneys tell their clients going through a divorce. Put aside your petty differences and focus on GETTING ON WITH LIFE.

I am not saying to just give in. However, I am saying really focus on the BIG PICTURE items. Focus on the big dollar items. Focus on the house worth $300,000 rather than the photo album. Yes, the photo album is important but you can easily duplicate those.  Does it REALLY matter if you have the original photos or a copy? It’s the picture, the memory, that matter… isn’t it?

I have worked with other clients who develop serious medical conditions due to the stress their sibling causes them. Family fights aren’t always avoidable but I would say they often are.  Focus in and move on!

I think I am really good at working with my client to focus in on the important things. I pride myself at helping my clients GET ON WITH THEIR LIFE.  Talk to me if you and your sibling are fighting about mom and dad’s stuff. Maybe we can solve it together!?

Probate House Saga and Mystery – Read at your own risk!

My post the other day with the totally destroyed house here in Sacramento reminded me of another probate house from a few years ago. This one involved an incredible mystery which I will try to get to in the coming days. However, for today I’ll just give you the basic overview and some pictures of the house.

A single man lived in this house. The house was in a quiet neighborhood near Sacramento.  He was a retired professor from a major university.  The term “nutty professor” comes to mind… though when you see the pictures you’ll realize it was much worse.  MUCH WORSE.  The pictures below are graphic and rather disgusting. This post is not for the faint of heart.

The house was facing foreclosure when I was hired in early 2009. The nutty professor had died and his family had come in to try and take care of his final arrangements. They told me the house was in very poor condition. I said, “ohhhh, I have seen horrible houses… so send me the pictures.  My client warned me, “no really… the pictures are disgusting….”

Well, I got a look at the pictures and yes they were disgusting. I forwarded them to a few friends hoping to find someone that would buy it out of foreclosure to make some money for the estate. We tried to get a Realtor to list it but time was short.

We had no valid reason to file a motion for a temporary restraining order to stop the foreclosure so we contacted the bank and slowed them down. While we slowed the bank down we worked hard to find a buyer.  We were ultimately not successful as the house was in too bad of condition that people didn’t want to take a chance. There is uninhabitable and then there is this.

This man, the nutty professor, was actually living here.  You start at the front door and it looks pretty innocent right.  His Mustang convertible in the driveway….

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The front door does not show what’s going on behind closed doors….

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The backyard looks fine and even has a pool….

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Ok, so the pool is not well kept.  I guess the nutty professor stopped paying the pool service!?

It does have a laundry room though….

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It also has a two car garage….

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Ok, now is where it gets a tad graphic and rather tragic.  The above shows a common problem. An elderly person who hoards stuff and doesn’t throw ANYTHING away.  That’s NOTHING….

The nutty professor liked movies… are those Betamax tapes!?

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There is a fireplace though….

Now the brutal pictures. Remember someone was LIVING HERE!

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You still with me?  Maybe the pictures aren’t graphic enough for you?  Some more information may help to show how disgusting this situation was. Remember this man was a retired professor from a university.  There was no running water… i.e. no plumbing. Can you guess what’s in the jugs and cans?

I also see cans of Alpo but as far as I know the man didn’t have a dog. However, let’s hope he did.

You ask, did he not have any money? He was a retired professor with a pension from a major university. Certainly he could have called the plumber at least.

This is the mystery!  He had a back tax bill of several hundred thousand dollars but no money in the bank.  We researched tax records, subpoenaed bank records and you know what we found?  It’s actually REALLY interesting.  Come back another day and I’ll tell you!

-John